Diagnostic Radiology

Multi-Slice Helical CT Scanner

  • Provides detailed, cross-sectional view to accurately diagnose conditions.

  • State-of-the-art image quality.

  • Scan saved to CD, not film, allowing for immediate transfer of images.

  • Allows easier access and convenience for patients.

  • Supplies clear information to plan radiation treatments.

PET Scanner

  • Is used to detect sites and activity of cancer

  • Assists in staging and localization of disease

  • Helps determine the response to cancer treatment

Lean more about PET scanning >


Screening Services

Annual Lung Cancer Screening Event.

In recognition of Lung Cancer Awareness Month, Cancer Center of North Dakota and Independent Radiology Services, Ltd offer FREE CT Scan Screenings November 1st to the 30th, 2019.

Eligible Patients: Men & Women 55 years of age and older AND have smoked one pack of cigarettes per day for 30 years.


Cancer Screening Guidelines from the American Cancer Society.

Early Detection of Colon and Rectal Cancer.

The following cancer screening guidelines are recommended for those men and women at average risk for cancer (unless otherwise specified) and without any specific symptoms.

Beginning at age 50, both men and women should follow 1 of these 5 testing schedules:

  1. Yearly fecal occult blood test (FOBT)* of fecal immunochemical test (FIT)

  2. Flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years

  3. Yearly FOBT* or FIT, plus flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years**

  4. Double-contrast barium enema every 5 years

  5. Colonoscopy every 10 years

All positive tests should be followed up with colonoscopy.

Talk to your doctor about starting colorectal cancer screening earlier and/or undergoing screening more often if you have any of the following colorectal cancer risk factors:

  • Personal history of colorectal cancer or adenomatous polyps

  • A strong family history of colorectal cancer of polyps

  • Personal history of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

  • A family history of an hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome

Contact your primary car physician for further details.

*For FOBT, the take-home multiple sample method should be used.

**The combination of yearly FOBT or FIT flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years is preferred over either of these options alone.


Early Detection of Prostate Cancer


The following cancer screening guidelines are recommended for those men at average risk for cancer (unless otherwise specified) and without any specific symptoms.

Both the prostate-specific antigen (PAS) blood test and digital rectal examination (DRE) should be offered annually, beginning at age 50, to men who have at least a 10-year life expectancy. Men at high risk (African-American men and men with a strong family of one or more first-degree relatives {father, brothers} diagnosed before age 65) should begin testing at age 45. Men at even higher risk, due to multiple first-degree relatives affected at an early age, could begin testing at age 40. Depending on the results of this initial test, no further testing might be needed until age 45.

Information should be provided to all men about what is known and what is uncertain regarding the benefits, limitations, and the harms of early detection and treatment of prostate cancer so that they can make an informed decision about testing.

Men who ask their doctor to make the decision on their behalf should be tested. Discouraging testing is not appropriate. Also, not offering testing is not appropriate.

Contact your primary care physician for further details.


Early Detection of Breast Cancer

The following cancer screening guidelines are recommended for those women at average risk for cancer (unless otherwise specified) and without any specific symptoms.

  • Yearly mammograms are recommended starting at age 40 and continuing for as long as a woman is in good health.

  • Clinical breast exam (CBE) should be part of a periodic health exam, about every 3 years for women in their 20s and 30s and every year for women 40 and over.

  • Women at high risk (greater than 20% lifetime risk) should get an MRI and mammogram every year. Women at moderately increased risk (15% to 20% lifetime risk) should talk with their doctors about the benefits and limitations of adding MRI screening to their yearly mammogram. Yearly MRI screening is not recommended for women whose lifetime risk of breast cancer is less than 15%.

Contact your primary care physicians for further details.


Second Opinion

We invite you to consult with us for a second opinion.
Please email us to request an appointment.